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LIVE STORIES: What do you want to do in 2022?

livestories_2022_acingles

Into the Story

EL PODCAST PARA APRENDER INGLÉS CON HISTORIAS REALES

livestories_2022_acingles

LIVE STORIES: What do you want to do in 2022?

Nivel: Intermedio Alto
Acento: Inglés Canadiense

Hi there listeners! Today we have another Live Stories episode for you. Instead of our normal Into the Story format, in Live Stories we go out into the streets and ask people just one question. Their answers are totally live and unscripted, which means this is 100% authentic English as it’s spoken literally on the streets! En este nuevo formato queremos darte más ejemplos del inglés tal como se habla en la calle, para que te acostumbres al ritmo y vocabulario de los native speakers

We’re at the beginning of a New Year, and naturally, it’s a time when many of us make plans for the year ahead. Bree’s mom, Shauna, who’s been on the show before, went out into the streets of Calgary, Canada to ask people the question: ‘What would you like to do in 2022?‘. Take a listen to the episode below to hear what they said!

[00:00:11.530] – Bree

AC Inglés presenta ‘Into the Story’ el podcast para aprender inglés con historias reales contadas por gente de todo el mundo. Hey there listeners, it’s your host, Bree, here and today we have another Live Stories episode for you. So instead of our normal Into the Story format where you listen to the story of just one person in Live Stories, we go out into the streets and ask people a question. Their answers are totally unscripted, which means that this is 100 percent authentic English, as it’s spoken literally on the streets.

 

[00:00:49.850] – Bree

And a really quick thing before we get into it. Have you shared Into the Story with anyone else yet? You know, like your friend who is always looking for a new way to improve their English? I would be so grateful if you would just take one minute to share this episode with someone that you know would find it valuable. All you have to do is head to the platform where you’re listening -no matter where you listen- click the share button or icon and just send it on over. Thank you so much for doing so.

 

[00:01:22.970] – Bree

All right, here we go. Let’s get into it. So we are at the beginning of a new year, and naturally, it’s a time when many of us are making plans for the year ahead. My mum Shauna, who’s been on this show before, went out into the streets of Calgary, Canada, to ask people a question: What would you like to do in 2022? Let’s take a listen to what they said.

 

[00:01:52.400] – Eileen

OK, I’m here with Eileen here in Calgary, Canada. And the question is, what would you like to do in 2022? I would like to exercise. I would like to eat healthy because I am diabetic. So that’s what my plans are for 2022 and love my grandchildren so much more.

 

[00:02:18.110] – Shauna

Alright. Well, thank you, Eileen. I appreciate it.

 

[00:02:20.480] – Eileen

Have a nice day.

 

[00:02:21.260] – Shauna

I will. You too. Thanks.

 

[00:02:27.190] – John

Well, I guess I’m a musician, so I’d prefer to write more often. I got to make more time for me and maybe take more time off to write.

 

[00:02:38.230] – Shauna

That’s nice.

 

[00:02:39.190] – John

That would be my answer.

 

[00:02:40.810] – Shauna

Cool.

 

[00:02:41.320] – John

Yes.

 

[00:02:44.260] – Woman

What to do I want to do in 2022?

 

[00:02:46.330] – Shauna

Yeah.

 

[00:02:48.880] – Woman

I’d like to be able to walk around without a mask. That’s what they like to do.

 

[00:02:54.740] – Shauna

OK.

 

[00:02:55.580] – Woman 

That’s what I’d really like to do.

 

[00:02:56.750] – Shauna

Thank you. Appreciate it. OK. Have a great year.

 

[00:02:59.630] – Woman

Thank you.

 

[00:03:02.880] – Woman 2

Interacting with people.

 

[00:03:04.440] – Shauna

Yeah.

 

[00:03:05.040] – Woman 2

And real hugging and you know. Yeah, we missed the two years. So…

 

[00:03:11.160] – Shauna

Yeah

 

[00:03:11.790] – Woman 2

Yeah, definitely. I don’t know. That’s all I could think of right now.

 

[00:03:15.790] – Shauna

Mm hmm. OK. And you?

 

[00:03:18.640] – Man

Probably go travel. I haven’t seen my family in three and a half years, so I’d go back to Europe.

 

[00:03:23.790] – Shauna

Where are they?

 

[00:03:23.790] – Man

In Switzerland.

 

[00:03:24.600] – Shauna

Oh, nice.

 

[00:03:25.410] – Man

Yeah, yeah.

 

[00:03:26.170] – Shauna

Oh, okay. Well, thank you so much. I appreciate it.

 

[00:03:31.710] – Man 2

Travel, but I know that’s not going to happen.

 

[00:03:33.630] – Shauna

Yeah.

 

[00:03:35.400] – Man 2

I don’t know. Just go through COVID safe and the rest of my family to be healthy and happy, so simple and sweet.

 

[00:03:44.860] – Shauna

Simple and sweet that is that is profound, isn’t it?

 

[00:03:47.370] – Man 2

Yeah.

 

[00:03:47.910] – Shauna

You know, we get back to something really basic, whereas before we were wanting something monetary or…

 

[00:03:54.270] – Man 2

Yeah, well, we took a lot of things for granted, I think. And yeah, stay healthy, stay happy and make make the best of things right.

 

[00:04:01.780] – Shauna

Oh, I love that wonderful. Well, thank you so much.

 

[00:04:04.780] – Man 2

You’re welcome.

 

[00:04:05.480] – Shauna

I really appreciate that.

 

[00:04:07.390] – Colleen

Oh, I mean, I would I would love to go to Europe. I, you know, I would love to go away and book a flight and go away for a month.

 

[00:04:16.820] – Shauna

Oh, wouldn’t that be wonderful.

 

[00:04:22.040] – Shauna

This is Shauna here, and I’ve been asking this question of different people, just random people that I come across that are willing to answer: what would you like to do in 2022? And for that question myself to answer that would be to spend the time that I have that’s extra with family and friends and to make it make it really special. However, that might be, it might just be cooking a meal, nothing as big and ostentatious as I used to think. OK. Hope you’re having a great year.

 

[00:04:59.980] – Bree

Wow. Thank you so much to all of these kind strangers for telling us their plans for the year. I heard a couple of themes come up. One being travel. I think that people really are excited about going on trips. And another theme that came up was enjoying simple moments with friends and family. So my mum says that she wants to enjoy doing simple things like preparing a family meal. That time together doesn’t need to include anything ostentatious, which is ‘ostentoso’. And that is what I am hoping for in 2022. I have booked a flight to travel back home to Canada to visit family and friends, and I hope to enjoy simple pleasures like maybe enjoying watching a movie with my niece and nephew or going hiking in the mountains with my sister.

 

[00:05:54.820] – Bree 

OK, that’s all for today’s Live Stories episode. So what would you like to do in 2022? Just send us an email with a voice note to hello@acingles.com. I personally open and respond to every single email you send, so please don’t be shy. I would love to hear from you.

 

[00:06:19.570] – Bree

Don’t forget to subscribe to our show to get the newest episodes. And if you want to help us continue bringing you true stories from people all over the world, then we would be so grateful if you would leave us a five star rating on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. OK, friends, until next time, we hope you have a good time or at least a good story to tell.

 

[00:06:47.040] – Shauna

Well, Ted, what would you like to do in 2022

 

[00:06:50.280] – Ted

In 2022? Umm… I’d have wine with Shauna at least once a month!

We hope you enjoyed today’s episode of LIVE STORIES. Si has disfrutado con este episodio, puedes mantenerte al día con todos nuestros podcasts, videoclases y eventos especiales suscribiéndote a la newsletter de AC inglés! Solo tienes que dejarnos tus datos aquí abajo. We can’t wait to see you there! 🤗

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34. A Story About Raising Bilingual Children

p34_raising_bilingual_children02_acingles

Into the Story

EL PODCAST PARA APRENDER INGLÉS CON HISTORIAS REALES

p34_raising_bilingual_children02_acingles

Episode 34: A Story About Raising Bilingual Children

Nivel: Intermedio
Acento: Español

¿Es posible educar a tus hijos en dos lenguas aunque no domines una de ellas? Alex, nuestro invitado de esta semana, el living proof de que sí, en efecto, ¡Es posible! When his first child was born, Alex did some research, and read all about the benefits of growing up speaking two languages. He only spoke Spanish and a little bit of English, pero decidió que le hablaría en inglés a su hijo, y aprendería lo necesario para enseñarle mientras crecía. ¿Cómo le fue el experimento? Listen to the episode below to find out!

Today’s episode of Into The Story is about rising bilingual children. As you listen to Alex tell us about his educational journey, you will learn useful vocabulary, such as the meaning of ‘nursery rhymes‘, ‘freak out‘ and ‘turn heads‘. Si la historia de Alex te fascina tanto como a nosotros, puedes seguir su language learning adventure en su blog Crecer En Inglés y su podcast Aventura Bilingüe. But first, check out his story right here 👇😉

Quote of the episode

“I remember we went to a friend’s house, Raul was one year old, he was playing with the typical toys on the floor, and I said: ‘Raul, come here one second, give me that ball’, and that baby understood me very well in English! I remember that two friends turned their heads and said, ‘Wow! That’s working.’ And I said, ‘Yes, why not?” – Alex

Bree (00:02)

AC Inglés presenta ‘Into the Story’ el podcast para aprender inglés con historias reales contadas por gente de todo el mundo. Hey, there listeners, today’s story is about raising bilingual children. En el episodio de hoy, hablamos con un invitado especial, Alex Perdel, de la plataforma Crecer en Inglés. Alex nos relata su experiencia creando un hogar bilingüe como español hablando con sus hijos en inglés.

Alex (00:40)

‘We were so excited about waiting for Raul… we were talking about a lot of things for the future of him. One of the things that we were talking was about the English in Spain. We don’t have a very good level but we knew that we had to do something….’

Bree (00:59)

In today’s story, Alex talks about the decision to begin speaking to his son, Raul, in English and how he began this process. He also shares some of the challenges he faced along the way and how eventually this language experiment became his work. Continue listening to find out more about Alex’s English parenting journey and his platform, Crecer en Inglés. Antes de escuchar la historia de hoy, veamos 4 palabras y expresiones interesantes que utiliza Alex en este episodio:

Bree (01:37)

Firstly, nursery rhymes. In English, a nursery rhyme is a traditional song sung to help children usually fall asleep. En español diríamos canciones infantiles o canciones de cuna. You’ll hear Alex today talk about singing his son nursery rhymes in English as a way to immerse him in the language. Nursery rhymes.

Bree (02:04)

Secondly, to freak out this informal phrasal verb, to freak out, in English can mean different things in different contexts. If someone says spiders freak me out or I freak out, if I see a spider, it means spiders cause me to become anxious, afraid or upset, or I become very upset, anxious or afraid when I see spiders.

Bree (02:31)

On the other hand, a person can also freak out when they receive good news. In this case, the expression means to become excited or very emotional. Freak out. Next to turn heads. In today’s podcast episode, Alex talks about his family and friends turning their heads when they heard him speak to his son, Raul, in English for the first time. In English, if someone or something turns heads, it means that it gets their attention. To turn heads.

Bree (03:05)

And finally, to grow up. To grow up is a phrasal verb that we use in English to talk about children growing and developing into adults. In Spanish, we would simply say crecer. See if you can hear Alex use this expression in his story to talk about his children growing up in a bilingual home. To grow up.

Bree (03:29)

Si quieres la transcripción, la ficha de vocabulario, y un test de comprensión de este episodio, sigue el enlace en las notas del programa. OK, now, let’s get into the story…

Alex (03:42)

Hello, I’m Alex Perdel, I’m from Seville. I’m 38 years old now. Oh my God. We were so excited about waiting for Raul. We were talking about a lot of things for the future of him. What will we will have in the future? The work, the school, the football match. I don’t know. A lot of things. One of the things that we were talking was about the English in Spain. We don’t have a very good level now maybe from when we grow up from when I was a child.

Alex (04:19)

But we knew that we had to do something for try to to give a good level. We started to share a lot of information on the internet about how you can speak in English at home. Is good? Is bad? The typical doubt. The typical mistakes and what a crazy idea that we say what why not? Maybe we can try to speak in English to him or if not to speak maybe the TV in English we go because we were watching TV in English, maybe a little book, maybe a bilingual school.

Alex (04:53)

But the bilingual education in Spain, the people say that it is no good. I don’t know, I am going to share. So we say, Well, maybe we can try to speak something or put on the telly or the songs, why not? We are going to try to do that.

Bree (05:07)

Alex did a lot of research about the advantages of growing up in a bilingual home. He realized children in a lot of countries learned several languages at an early age, and not only is it easy for them, it’s incredibly beneficial. They decided Alex would be the English speaking parent while his wife would speak to their son in Spanish.

Alex (05:30)

Of course, the first day I don’t speak all the time, I I didn’t have vocabulary for a baby, I didn’t have good expressions. I don’t have cute words for him… lovely, sweetheart. The typical first words for the baby. The baby don’t speak to you. It’s difficult the first time. But I say, OK, I’m going to try to do the little routines in the bathroom, cooking with him when you describe the ingredients or the food. And step by step for three, four months, I feel very comfortable in this moment.

Alex (06:03)

I say, OK, that is fine. The most positive ingredient for that adventure that was that when I started speaking English to my baby, he laughed, he enjoyed and the nursery rhymes helped to sleep. So OK that this communication. It is a language. It’s not (chemical) science. It’s not (going) to space in a rocket. No it is it’s very, very simple. Was only communicate with him, not only with the world in English, only with the expression of the face, or only with the pronunciation, with the the tone of your voice.

Alex (06:44)

And doing that at the same time with the English language was fun for him, and I feel that how he loved me in not natural language for me. I said if I could do that in English, that is working. And, of course, the first time the people freak out and say, ‘wow, what are you doing? Why? Why you are going to try to speak in English? That is not natural. Are you crazy?’ I say maybe. Yes, I know. I don’t know.

Bree (07:17)

One year after beginning his language experiment, Alex realized that little Raul was understanding English. This gave Alex the confidence to keep going, despite some friends and family finding the concept a little bit strange.

Alex (07:34)

Obviously, one year after I remember that we went to a friend’s house to lunch with another friends, maybe 10 people, and Raul was one year, one year and a half and he was playing with the typical toys on the floor and I say, ‘Oh Raul, please come here one second, give me the ball or give me the car. Be careful. Don’t stand up. Don’t sit down there on the sofa. I don’t know… the typical expressions. You say the instructions to the baby. That baby understood me very well in English and the people looked at me and said…I remember that two friends turned their heads and said, ‘Wow! That’s working.’ And I said, ‘Yes, why not? Why not is it going to work?’

Alex (08:19)

For me, that was the best moment to say yes, I had to continue. One year after. That’s one year. It’s not easy. But one year after he could understand structure. Complete… I think that they are complicated no? Please, Raul, don’t sit there or can you come here and give me something? Well, it’s a lot of grammar structure for a baby. And he understood all the things so (it) was an awesome moment.

Bree (08:47)

Alex’s English parenting journey was going well, but he wasn’t finished. He decided he wanted to share what he had learned with other parents looking to raise bilingual children. Alex decided to collect all the resources and information he had learned and put it together in a podcast and online platform.

Alex (09:08)

The project started like a hobby. I started writing for him. To Raul, Raul, when you grow up… you will read that today, we went to the grammar hours and listen to a baby song and I was talking for him. I wrote for him. Four months later, I started the podcast because too write is good. But I said, I need to talk about that. I need to express with my voice. I need to talk to the people how is that, only a little.

Alex (09:41)

I start to talk about the tips. The main typical doubts or mistakes and (do) interviews for (to) learn because at the same time my baby was very, very small. So I, I, I was not an expert in this moment. I was learning at the same as the podcast. My podcast is like a road map of my bilingual experience. I started to have interviews with families, teachers, (scientists), doctors, all the people that could help to another person on a lot of people to grow up in English and the children.

Alex (10:19)

That was the beginning. One year later, I say, OK, maybe (this) could be work. Maybe I would like to have all the information, all the videos, all this real experience, all this examples, and a lot of concepts, tips, (resources) and ideas in only one platform. I say, OK, (is) anybody do that? I’m going to do it. So I made the platform for help to the people to grow up in English, to their children.

Bree (10:49)

Thanks to his hard work and passion for raising his son in a bilingual home, Crecer en Inglés was born and Alex’s language hobby became his job. Five years on, both his sons are fluent in English and Spanish, and they continue to grow and learn the language together with their father.

Alex (11:09)

I think that the people are in the comfort zone. It’s easier, of course, later when pass the years, you say, Oh, now I have to go to academy. You are lucky. Sorry. Yeah, you are lucky. No no. It’s effort, not lucky. That is not a lottery. I don’t have a… when Raul was born, I don’t say ‘take’ it’s a bilingual boy! No. OK, so I think that the people have to change.

Alex (11:42)

OK, I’m going to be positive a lot of people now start to try something… books, TV, songs maybe in English. I see that the concept of the bilingual or the most important second language. It starts to change and that is good. In a bilingual adventure I had, I think that the most beautiful thing that you can learn is that your child, your son, your daughter connect(s) with you in a second language in a very different way.

Alex (12:15)

The natural language for you is very different. The connection is (a) special. It’s magic. When my son say hi five to me, when my song say, Can I have a hug? The connection to me is different. It’s not the same. It’s is because this is special for us. No front on that or not, because it’s English. Maybe it could be another language. But it’s (its) own language, its own way to communicate is already joke in another language that make that, that is different.

Alex (12:47)

I learned to enjoy or we learn together. We learn to enjoy, to be fun, to be angry, to argue in a second language and make a very special relationship together.

Bree (13:08)

Thank you so much, Alex, for sharing your story with us and for helping so many families out there find their own path to creating a bilingual home. If you want to learn more about teaching your children English, I recommend listening to Alex’s podcast, Aventura bilingüe, where he shares stories, tips and also the science behind creating a bilingual home. You can also check his website Crecer en Inglés, which is full of resources. You’ll find links to both on our website, acingles.com.

Bree (13:43)

And that’s all for today’s episode. Don’t forget to subscribe to our show to get the newest episodes. And if you want to help us continue bringing you true stories of people from all over the world, then we would be so grateful if you’d leave us a five star rating on Apple Podcasts or on Spotify. OK, friends, until next time, we hope you have a good time, or at least a good story to tell.

Wonderful Words

awesome
very impressive, amazing or inspiring

raise (children)
to have, look after and bring up children

rocket
a spaceship

telly
a slang word to refer to television

toy
an object for children to play with

Excellent Expressions

to freak out
(1) to become very anxious, upset or
afraid because of something or someone
(2) to be excited or very emotional because of something or someone

to grow up
refers to children getting older, developing
(mentally and physically) and becoming adults

nursery rhymes
songs for children that are typically sung before bedtime to help them sleep

to turn heads
to get someone’s attention

We hope you enjoyed today’s episode of Into The StorySi has disfrutado con la historia de Alex, puedes mantenerte al día con todos nuestros podcasts, videoclases y eventos especiales suscribiéndote a la newsletter de AC inglés! Solo tienes que dejarnos tus datos aquí abajo. We can’t wait to see you there! 🤗

Suscríbete a las clases semanales gratis de AC inglés

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Join the AC Family

We hope you enjoyed today’s episode of Into The StorySi has disfrutado con la historia de Cilla, nos ayudaría muchísimo si nos dejaras un comentario o una buena puntuación en tu plataforma de podcasts favorita. 

Para mantenerte al día con todos nuestros podcasts, videoclases y eventos especiales, suscríbete ahora a la newsletter de AC inglés introduciendo tus datos aquí abajo 👇 We can’t wait to see you there! 🤗

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33. A Story About Busking

Episode 33 - Busking - acingles

Into the Story

EL PODCAST PARA APRENDER INGLÉS CON HISTORIAS REALES

Episode 33 - Busking - acingles

Episodio 33: A Story About Busking

Nivel: Intermedio
Acento: Inglés

En el episodio de hoy, Alistair nos contará su experiencia tocando la gaita en la calle (busking). Como muchos jóvenes en Inglaterra, Alistair, a los 18 años, decide tomarse un año sabático para viajar y conocer el mundo, y pronto se encuentra en un tren en dirección a Francia, donde su plan es conseguir trabajo de camarero. But when he gets there, things are not simple as he thought…

Today’s episode of Into The Story is about busking. Mientras escuchas a Alistair contándonos sus aventuras como músico callejero, aprenderás expresiones en inglés muy útiles, como ‘to be one step ahead’, ‘to support oneself’ and ‘out of the corner of your eye’. Si la voz de Alistair parece un poco más clara que la de otros de nuestros invitados, ¡Es porque Alistair tiene su propio podcast! English Learning For Curious Minds es un podcast para aprender inglés a la vez que descubres cosas sobre el mundo. Make sure to check it out after you listen to the episode below! 😉

Quote of the episode

“My memory of my time there is filled with these slightly strange anecdotes and unusual experiences that you have if you put yourself in unusual positions” – Alistair

Bree: Today we have a very special storyteller. Alastair from the English Learning for Curious Minds podcast is going to be telling us a story about busking, which best translates as música callejera en espanol. Como muchos jóvenes en Inglaterra, Alistair, a los 18 años, decide tomarse un año sabático para conocer el mundo y pronto se encuentra en un tren en dirección a Francia. 

Alistair: ‘the idea is that you get a job… I wanted to do something different with my time…’

Bree: Life in France does not go to plan and Alistair finds himself on the street playing his bagpipes – su gaita – as a way to earn enough money to survive and pay for his hotel. Then one day, a bizarre and unexpected event happens while Alistair is playing his bagpipe for his audience in the streets of Lille. Keep listening to find out what happened to Alistair that day…

Hi there listeners! Si quieres apoyarnos para seguir produciendo nuevos y mejores episodios, comparte este podcast con un amigo o amiga que necesite (ayuda) con su inglés. Y si utilizas apple podcasts, déjanos una valoración de 5 estrellas. Thank you so much!

Ok antes de escuchar la historia de hoy, veamos 6 palabras y expresiones interesantes que utiliza Alistair en este episodio: 

  1. First off, a word you’ll hear throughout the episode today is the English word ‘busking’ spelt B-U-S-K-I-N-G. Busking describes a situation in which a person or a group of people – buskers – play an instrument or perform in the street and collect money, usually spare change, from the public. Busking.
  2. Next, to get into. This expression, ‘to get into’ has a few key meanings in English. Firstly, you might hear people in English talk about ‘getting into university’. In this case, ‘to get into’ means ‘to be accepted’. In today’s podcast, Alistair uses ‘to get into’ to mean ‘to get involved in’ or ‘become interested’ in an activity or a discussion. For instance you could say ‘I recently got into football. I play 2 to 3 times a week!’. Or if someone says ‘I really got into the music. I couldn’t stop dancing!’ It means that they really started to enjoy the music. To get into. 
  3. Next, let’s talk about the expression ‘to be one step ahead’. Alistair uses this expression to talk about moving to France before starting a French language degree at university. In this context ‘to be one step ahead’ means to be ‘better prepared’ than other students also studying French at university.
  4. Next, to support oneself. If you hear someone talk about ‘supporting themselves’ or ‘supporting their family’, this could mean a number of things depending on the context. You’ll hear Alistair talk about playing the bagpipes to support himself while in France. In this way, the expression ‘support oneself’ means to provide for himself financially and enough money to live off. To support oneself.
  5. Next, dubious. In English, the word dubious can be used in a number of situations to mean ‘doubting’, ‘uncertain’ or ‘suspicious’. For example, if someone says ‘I was extremely dubious about accepting the offer from the car salesman’ it means that they don’t trust the salesman or question the genuineness of the offer. You could also use the word dubious in a sentence like ‘I had the dubious role of hosting the concert’. In this case, the word ‘dubious’ suggests that the responsibility of hosting the concert is actually unpleasant and not as honorable, glamorous or fun as someone might think. Dubious.
  6. Finally, you’ll hear Alistair use the expression ‘out of the corner of one’s eye’. To see something out of the corner of your eye means to see something to the side of where you are looking. In other words, it means that I wasn’t looking directly at the object when I saw it and may not have seen it clearly. ‘out of the corner of one’s eye’.

Alistair: My name is Alistair Budge. I’m 34 years old. I’m originally from the UK as you might be able to tell from my accent from the south of England. In the UK it is a relatively common thing for people to take what’s called a gap year, so a year off between finishing high school and studying university. And people tend to do lots of different things. Some people will go traveling, some people will get a job or… the idea is that you go and have lots of different experiences that you haven’t ever had when you were at school. And I wanted to do something a little bit difference with my time and I thought what am I good at and what do I want to develop, what skills do I want to get better at? And I had a place to study French and Italian at university so I thought you know what, I would like to go and spend some time living in France so that I can try to be one step ahead when I arrive at university. And I thought, what can I do in France?  Well I don’t really have any skills because I’m only 18 years old but I am a native English speaker and perhaps I can get a job at a restaurant or something like that. So I thought I’ll try. 

Bree: So just like that, Alistair decided to spend his gap year in France and try his luck getting a job as a waiter there.

Alistair: And I got on a train because you can actually get on a train from, from England to France, you can take the Eurostar and the first stop on the Eurostar in France is Lille which is a sort of industrial city in North Eastern France. And I thought okay well I’ll just go around some of the restaurants and see if anyone will take me. I had never really applied for a job before so I didn’t really know how any of this stuff worked. I thought I’ll print out a CV and someone will say yes that sounds like a… the kind of person that we’d like to be a waiter in a restaurant and that’s how it all worked. So I did that! I went around restaurants around a week and it turns out that’s not how the world works and no one called me back and I was unable to get a job or unable to get anyone interested in employing me at all, which reflecting back on it now is hardly surprising but for me at the time it was a little surprising. 

Bree: Alistair’s plan to work in a restaurant was not working so he needed a plan B…

Alistair: But, I had a secret weapon in my, in my armoury which was that alongside being able to speak some French, I could also play the bagpipes. So the bagpipes for listeners who might not be aware of what those are, are the traditional instruments from Scotland. There’s a… it’s kind of like a recorder I guess with a big bag in it that makes a lot of noise and I had grown up, until I was 13, in Scotland. And my my father is Scottish and was able to play the bagpipes and I also, from when I was sixteen or so, I started doing busking which is when you play an instrument in the streets and you put a hat or a case down there and generous people give you coins or, if you’re lucky, paper money to support you. 

So I had taken my bagpipes with me to Lille as a back-up plan. I thought well it’ll be a little bit exotic and I can just see if what works in London and in the small town that I lived in in England also works in Lille. And so after failing miserably to get a legitimate job at a restaurant I, I went out one day with my bagpipes and I also had, I was wearing the traditional Scottish outfit so this is a kilt which is what many people think looks like a skirt and jacket and tie and things like that. I’d done experiments where I’d busked in normal… kinda non-traditional clothes and then I busked in traditional clothes. You always make more money if you are wearing traditional clothes. So I brought this with me because I knew that was a good thing to do. And I set up my bagpipes and started playing.

Bagpipes as you may know are loud. So you have to choose a place where you’re not going to disturb too many people and the place that I started playing was outside the train station and the area around Lille train station is like the area around many train stations in large cities as… a slightly strange area. There were all sorts of people doing things of dubious legality and things that they probably shouldn’t be doing. Anyway that was the area that I chose to set up my shop and surprise surprise, people did start giving me money!  And it was a nice surprise because I realised that wow I can get this to work and it’s a way of being able to support myself while I am here. And my life for perhaps a month or two, consisted of me waking up in the morning, going out and busking for half an hour, 45 minutes until my lungs were completely exhausted and I couldn’t play anymore and I might earn 30 or 40 euros and pay for my incredibly sad hotel.

Bree: Busking outside the Lille train station was not Alistair’s original plan but for the moment playing his bagpipes was earning him enough money to survive in France. Until one day, while playing his bagpipes, a very unexpected thing happened…

Alistair: And this particular story that I wanted to tell you today is about a strange incident that happened during my busking times. I was standing outside the train station and doing what I had been doing for the past month or two months or so. And I started playing and there were kind people who would put coins in my case. And sometimes people would gather around and kinda listen. My normal clients I guess you could call them, my normal people who would give me money they tended to be mothers with children, or elderly people really. It was always quite easy to look at someone and think of the probability that they might give you any money or not. 

And one time this young man came up to me, he was probably a similar age to me. He was probably 18 or 19. A really big guy, shaved head looked… not look like a particularly nice guy. And I thought, ok is this going to be? 

Is he going to cause me some kind of trouble and because I had had people who had taken money from inside the case before. And I thought ok what was going to happen here. And instead, he was getting very into the music! He was clapping and he was kinda going ‘yeah yeah yeah’ and I was thinking ok I guess this might be good news he might be enjoying it. He just is… not the classic person who had given me money before. So I thought let’s just kinda leave him. It’s great. He was getting really really excited! He was loving it! 

And I should also add that I’m not a talented bagpiper at all… I am probably quite a bad bagpiper but I was exotic. People had probably never seen a bagpiper in LIlle before. So he was, this guy was really enjoying the music and he’s getting really into it and out of the corner of my eye, an elderly woman who must have been in her 70s or something, she came and she kinda jumped on my bagpipes and started shaking them and she was obviously very upset about something that was going on. Upset at the music or maybe she was a bagpipe expert and she was upset at the quality of my playing. But she was clearly upset about something. I just didn’t understand what and before I could sort of stop or see what was going on, this man, this super fan, he had punched her in the face! And this, this poor lady was kinda at my feet and he was standing over her kind of saying all sorts of nasty things and I can remember very clearly, kinda looking down and thinking, it’s a really surreal situation and I wasn’t really sure what to do!

But before long, it must have been only a couple of seconds, the French Riot police arrived because there were… there were big riots, big protests in France in that period. And people had set cars on fire and there was, there was a lot of violence in the cities. So there was a lot of police presence and these police had guns and they were quite aggressive looking people and the police. There must have been about two or three policemen or so but you know big people with guns and body armor and stuff. They arrived and they took this young man away. And I was like no no no, I was a crucial eye witness to the event but actually I don’t have a licence to play here or anything. I don’t want l I want to get in any kind of trouble and they they ask me you know what happened and I explained and they took him away and I unfortunately I don’t have any kind of further information about this poor man’s plight or what happened to him afterwards. Luckily, the woman was fine and that was all ok. Buit it was a very strange and completely surreal sequence of events and it all happened in the course of less than 30 seconds. I had gone from playing nicely, just doing what I had always been doing through to having a knocked out woman in front of me and the French riot police. So my time there is filled with these slightly strange anecdotes and examples of these unusual experiences that you have if you put yourself into slightly unusual positions. 

Bree:  It has been over 15 years since Alistair was busking on the streets of Lille. So what is he doing now you may be asking yourself?

Alistair: So I am not still busking, no. I did actually busk and continue to busk while I was at university. It was a very good way to make a bit of money as a student. I am now no longer a busker and I am even worse at the bagpipes than I was 16 years ago. Now I live in Malta. I have a company called Leonardo English and we make a podcast called ‘English Learning for Curious Minds’ aimed at intermediate to advanced independent English learners and the idea is that people can improve their English at the same time as they learn about weird and wonderful things about the world. So we have episodes on everything from the wives of Henry VIII through to how Google works, the space race, Disney, gangsters. All sorts of things! So I started ‘English Learning for Curious Minds’ just over 2 years ago and yes that’s what I am doing at the moment. It’s great to see the impact that podcasting can have and I think you are also doing some amazing work so you have won over a listener in me as well. 

Bree: Thank you so much for sharing your story with us Alastair! We highly recommend his podcast, English Learning for Curious Minds. It is full of interesting topics. Everything from James Bond to Fast Food to Pirates. You have a link to his podcast on our website or you can find it wherever you listen to podcasts.

And that is all for today’s episode! Para escuchar todos los episodios de Into the Story y no perderte los siguientes, suscríbete ahora en Spotify, Apple Podcasts, o en tu reproductor de podcasts favorito. Ok everyone, until next we hope you have a good time or at least a story to tell.

Wonderful Words

ARMOURY
1) a place where weapons are kept.
2) resources that you have available for a purpose.

BAGPIPES
A traditional wind musical instrument from Scotland.

BUSKING
When people or a group of people play an instrument or perform in the street and collect money from people walking by.

DUBIOUS
Suspicious, uncertain or dishonest.

KILT
A traditional Scottish skirt printed with checks worn by men.

KNOCKED OUT
To be unconscious or defeated by something or someone.

PLIGHT
A dangerous, difficult or unlucky situation.

RECORDER
A simple wind instrument.

Excellent Expressions

TO BE ONE STEP AHEAD
To be overprepared or to be in the lead of
someone else.

TO CALL BACK
To return a call.

GAP YEAR
A sabbatical year that many young people do after school in order to travel or have different experiences.

TO GET INTO (SOMETHING)
To get involved in an activity or to start enjoying something.

OUT OF THE CORNER OF ONE’S EYE
To see something to the side of your field of vision.

TO SUPPORT ONESELF
To provide financially for oneself.

We hope you enjoyed today’s episode of Into The StorySi has disfrutado con la historia de Alistair, puedes mantenerte al día con todos nuestros podcasts, videoclases y eventos especiales suscribiéndote a la newsletter de AC inglés! Solo tienes que dejarnos tus datos aquí abajo 👇 We can’t wait to see you there! 🤗

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We hope you enjoyed today’s episode of Into The StorySi has disfrutado con la historia de Cilla, nos ayudaría muchísimo si nos dejaras un comentario o una buena puntuación en tu plataforma de podcasts favorita. 

Para mantenerte al día con todos nuestros podcasts, videoclases y eventos especiales, suscríbete ahora a la newsletter de AC inglés introduciendo tus datos aquí abajo 👇 We can’t wait to see you there! 🤗

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LIVE STORIES: What do you do on Christmas Eve?

podcast_livestories_thmb03

Into the Story

EL PODCAST PARA APRENDER INGLÉS CON HISTORIAS REALES

podcast_livestories_thmb03

LIVE STORIES:
What do you do on Christmas Eve?

Nivel de inglés:  Intermedio
Acento: Varios

Today we have a special episode just in time for the winter holidays. We were curious to hear what people are doing this Christmas Eve, so we asked! Bree’s mom, Shauna, who you heard in our Christmas episode, went out into the streets of Calgary, Canada to ask a few people what their plans are this Christmas Eve. Let’s take a listen! En este episodio especial de Navidad, la madre de Bree ha salido a las calles de Clagary, Canadá, para hablar con distintas personas sobre cómo celebran la Nochebuena.

 

Bree: Hey there listeners, today we have a special bonus episode for you. We were curious to hear what people are doing this Christmas Eve, and so we asked. My mom, Shauna, who you heard in our Christmas episode, went out into the streets of Calgary, Canada, which is where I’m from, to ask a few people what their plans are this Christmas Eve. Let’s take a listen.

Francis: So this year, my daughter just turned two, so Christmas is going to be extra special for us. She’s actually very excited about the presents that are going underneath the tree and we’ll be allowing her to open one on Christmas Eve this year. And we’re also having my dad over for dinner.

Shauna: Nice, do you eat anything special?

Francis: We’re actually making Asian style fondue for dinner.

Shauna: Ooh, I’ve never heard of that.

Francis: Yeah, so it’s like a red wine base. And then we have like chicken, marinated beef, vegetables. You cook that in the broth and you have like different sauces that go along with that. So kind of a different … a bit of a different tradition at our place, but it’s kind of a French-Canadian.

Shauna: Oh, is it?

Francis: Yeah, French, Canadian, thing so.

Shauna: Oh Like that.

Francis: Yeah.

Shauna: Okay. Well, thank you very much, Francis. And that’s what a French Canadian living in Calgary is doing for this Christmas. Thank you.

Francis: Absolutely!

Calvin: Christmas Eve, I spend time with my family and my siblings to enjoy a morning brunch and play board games all day long.

Shauna: Oh cool, so what do you have for morning brunch?

Calvin: A morning brunch in Canada consists of lots of bacon and eggs and pancakes and orange juice.

Shauna: And what do you do for dinner?

Francis: We don’t eat dinner. We’ll nibble our snack. But our big meal of the day is is breakfast and brunch and just nibbling throughout the afternoon?

 Shauna: Oh, cool. All right. Well, thank you very much.

Calvin: You’re welcome.

Shauna: Appreciate it and have a great Christmas Eve.

Calvin: Perfect. Thank you.

Ricardo: Christmas Eve, we have a huge dinner and invite the entire family. Usually we either make turkey buns. That’s our Salvadorian specialty. It’s a really saucy turkey in a bun with watercress or we’ll make tamales, which is like a chicken and pork little pillow that’s really tasty as well. Yeah. And usually the presents get opened the same night. We don’t we don’t wait for the next morning to open the presents. Nobody has the patience. Yeah, that’s that’s pretty much every year. Get as much family together as possible and eat as much as possible. And we do dance a lot too.

Shauna: Oh do you? What kind of music?

Ricardo: Usually it’s all latino music, salsa, merengue, reggaeton is big nowadays.

Shauna: Okay. And how old is this little sweatheart?

Ricardo: Maeli is 16 months,

Shauna: 16 months?

Ricardo: Yeah, she’s already used to the parties. She loves dancing.

Bree: From the entire Into the Story team here at AC Inglés, we want to wish you a very happy holiday season. And here is what we are doing for Christmas Eve.

Speaker 6: Hi, guys. My name is Bec., I’m one of the producers and creators of the Into the Story podcast and on Christmas Eve this year, well, I think my Christmas will look a little bit different to past years, a little quieter than usual because I’ve just moved from Barcelona to Gran Canaria. So we don’t have the usual friends and family around to celebrate with. But usually on Christmas Eve for dinner, we do a traditional Venezuelan meal with my partner who’s from Venezuela, and we prepare things like hallacas which we make in advance. These are banana leaf packages with some dough stewed meats and veggies on the inside. Pan de jamón, like this ham bread. And ensalada de gallina, which is like this chicken and potato salad. And then usually in Venezuelan culture, the presents are opened after midnight on the 24th. But I might save present opening to the 25th morning, which is what I was used to growing up just to keep the magic of the Christmas story alive for my daughter.

Bree: Hey, everyone. It’s Bree 

Raül: Hi, I’m Raul

Bree: From AC. And this Christmas Eve, we are going to celebrate together with our two sons at home and we’re going to order in Chinese food. And we’re going to have a movie marathon. So we’re going to watch Love Actually. And probably The Grinch, which is our son Kai’s favorite movie these days. And we’re also going to…

Raül: What about the log?

Bree: And of course, we’re going to celebrate Caga Tiò.

Raül: We we went we went to pick up the log in the forest two weeks ago. We’ve been feeding this log every day with mandarins. And on Christmas Eve, and the kids hit, hit the log with stick with a stick and the log poop the presents under a blanket.

Bree: It’s a very, very interesting Catalan tradition.

Raül: Yeah, yeah really.

Bree: OK, so that’s what we’re doing this Christmas Eve. Merry Christmas, everyone.

Raül: Merry Christmas.

Bree: And that’s all for today’s bonus episode. Para escuchar todos los episodios de Into the Story y no perderte los siguientes, suscríbete ahora en Spotify, Apple Podcasts, o en tu reproductor de podcasts favorito. OK, everyone. Until next time, we hope you have a good time, or at least a good story to tell.

Este es el primer episodio de LIVE STORIES, una versión más casual y natural de nuestro podcast Into The Story, donde queremos ofrecerte más ejemplos del inglés tal como se habla en la vida real. Nuestras LIVE STORIES serán episodios más cortos con entrevistas y grabaciones hechas in the heat of the moment. Esperamos que te guste este twist en la fórmula que ya conoces. Let us know in the comments below! 

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32. A Story About Living With Diabetes

Ep 32 Cilla's story - acingles

Into the Story

EL PODCAST PARA APRENDER INGLÉS CON HISTORIAS REALES

Ep 32 Cilla's story - acingles

Episodio 32: Living with diabetes

Nivel de inglés:  Intermedio Alto
Acento: Australiano

Today’s [tooltips keyword=”story” content=”test meaning”] is about living with diabetes. Cuando Cilla, nuestra protagonista, era muy joven, sus padres descubrieron que tenía diabetes, es decir, que su cuerpo no producía la insulina necesaria para digerir bien los alimentos. ¿Qué significa vivir con esta enfermedad? ¿Qué obstáculos y desafíos implica? Esto es lo que descubriremos en el episodio de hoy.

Mientras escuchas a Cilla contándonos sus experiencias, aprenderás vocabulario en inglés muy útil, como el significado de ‘hassle’, ‘work out’ y ‘back up’. Después de tantos años, vivir con diabetes es bastante normal para Cilla, pero a veces se complica. Escucha el episodio completo para saber qué pasó el día que perdió su bomba de insulina…

Quote of the episode

‘What can happen is that sometimes you just have days where you've got a really high blood sugar and it makes you feel awful, but you just kind of get on with it, and live your normal life. I try my best, and I feel that even though I've had this illness now for 28 years, it's never stopped me doing anything’

-Cilla

Bree: Today’s story is about living with diabetes – vivir con diabetes. Our storyteller will be Cilla, from Australia. Cuando Cilla era muy joven, sus padres descubrieron que tenía diabetes, una enfermedad que significa que su cuerpo no produce los niveles de insulina necesarios para digerir bien los alimentos.

Cilla: Because I can’t remember life without it, it’s all I’ve ever known. So it has never been like I had to adjust to anything major. I think it was a much bigger adjustment for my parents. 

Bree: In today’s story you’ll hear Cilla explain stories from her childhood growing up with diabetes. She also shares her experiences living and travelling with an insulin pump – su bomba de insulina – a small medical device that she wears on her stomach to control her body’s hormone levels. After so many years, life with diabetes is pretty normal for Cilla but it does sometimes get complicated, like when she unexpectedly lost her pump. Keep listening to find out what happened that day… 

Before we talk about today’s vocabulary, could you do us a huge favour and share this episode with a friend who is improving their English? More listeners means we can continue producing more stories for you. Subscribing and leaving a positive review is also an excellent way to support the show. I’d like to give a personal thank you to Angeles who recently left us a 5 star review on Apple podcasts. She says “Bree hace excelentes podcasts que mejoran tu nivel de inglés”. Angeles, thank you so much for your kind words. I would like to say that even though it’s my voice you hear I cannot take all the credit for making this podcast! There’s a team of us working to produce Into the Story, and it takes us many hours to create each episode. So, from all of us at AC, thank you for your support, and for helping us continue doing what we’re doing.

Ok antes de escuchar la historia de hoy, veamos 5 palabras y expresiones interesantes que utiliza Cilla en este episodio: 

  1. Firstly, a hassle. The word hassle can be used as both a noun or a verb. If I hassle someone, it means that I annoy them. But if something ‘is a hassle’ then it means that it is an inconvenience. For example, driving to work in peak hour traffic can be a real hassle in the mornings. Hassle.
  2. Here’s another word that can be used as both a noun and a verb that you’ll hear Cilla use today: ‘back-up’. A ‘back up’ is a secure copy of something like a digital document or file that you make to avoid losing the information. Similarly, if someone ‘backs up’ their computer it means that they make a replacement or copy of the computer contents. In today’s episode, Cilla talks about carrying around back up supplies for her diabetes. Back up.
  3. Next, ‘to work out’. The phrasal verb to work out has a couple of interesting meanings in English. To work out can mean to exercise. But if I say that I need to work out my weekend plans. It means that I need to plan or organise them. But if I say that we need to work out this maths problem, it means that I need to solve the maths problem and find an answer. So to work out can mean, to exercise, to plan or organize, and to solve. To work out.
  4. The next expression is ‘to backtrack’. To backtrack in English means to review your steps or actions. In Cilla’s case, she needed to backtrack and visit all the places that she had been to earlier in the day to find her insulin pump. 
  5. And finally to be hard on oneself. If you are hard on someone or hard on yourself, it means that you criticise them in a way that is very strict or not very fair. For example, a teacher could be hard on the student’s work or parents can be hard on their children.

Si quieres la transcripción, la ficha de vocabulario, y un test de comprensión de este episodio, sigue el enlace en las notas del programa. OK, now, let’s get into the story…

Cilla: Hello my name is Cilla. It’s short for Priscilla. I’m 31 years old. I live currently in England, in Oxford. I’m originally from Australia and I’m going to go back to Australia. 

I was diagnosed with diabetes when I was 3. I got very sick. My body wasn’t making insulin and my blood sugars went really high and very high is about, I think it was around 27. So that’s like five times over the normal reading. And the symptoms you have when are really unwell are things like, I got really really thirsty. I felt very tired. I wanted to go to the toilet a lot. I just felt very ill. So yeah that’s when it started. 

Bree: And just like that so is life with diabetes began she and her family had to learn a lot about the illness, its effects on the body and how best to manage it. 

Cilla: So type 1 is when your pancreas so that’s an organ in your body. It stops  making insulin, which is a hormone. Now what insulin does is help to regulate your blood sugar. So when you eat something, insulin is released and it then helps to keep the sugar in your blood very level and very even. So that’s type one. That’s what I have. 

Type 2, probably more known as the adult diabetes, it is generally to do with lifestyle. You still make insulin but you don’t make it as well. So, people might have to take tablets or change their diet. But my type, my body completely stopped making insulin. 

Because I can’t remember life without it, it’s all I’ve ever known. So it has never been like I had to adjust to anything major. I think it was a much bigger adjustment for my parents, particularly my mum. My mom had to learn how to do things like carbohydrate counts. So carbohydrates in food and you have to have… give yourself injections with the insulin in it. 

Bree: Besides the injections and carbohydrate counting, Cilla led a pretty normal life but there were a few challenges that came with being a kid with diabetes.

Cilla:  When I was younger the thing that I remember finding the hardest is that I’d go to parties and there would be all this food that all the kids could eat and I couldn’t eat as much of that food because you do have to be careful how much sugar you have. You had a much more restrictive diet. I could occasionally have sweet things but not much. But as a kid I found that really hard and there were often times I couldn’t go to sleepovers at friends’ houses because I would need an injection just before going to bed and an injection first thing in the morning and I remember finding that really hard. 

And then when I was 15, I went on what was called an insulin pump. So it’s a little machine that I wear on my outside like I clip it to my jeans or a belt and it has a little tube that sits under the skin and it constantly gives me little amounts of insulin. And since I got that when I was 15. It has definitely made life much much easier. 

Bree: Thanks to her insulin pump, life with diabetes became much smoother for Cilla! She didn’t have to give herself injections anymore, nor did she need to manually check her insulin levels. Cilla and her insulin pump have however encountered some complicated situations…

Cilla: I’m very used to it now. I think one thing that I found where it gets to be more of a hassle is when I travel ‘cos I love traveling. But as probably people can imagine, going through airport security, I have gone to some countries that don’t understand much about diabetes and I’ve gone through and they’ve tried to take my diabetes supplies off. Doha, when I went through, they were like, we need to take this off you and I said no I need to keep it with me and it was a bit of arguing with them having very limited English. 

I think I have tried to feel as relaxed as I can. I don’t get very anxious or stressed. I figure it’s all going to work out in the end. It’s just part of traveling as a diabetic ‘cos I have to carry all my supplies with me which include like my insulin, my pump and things for doing blood tests and checking my blood sugar and back up of everything and extra supplies. So I have got a lot to carry. So there are a lot of myths and misunderstandings and people just not sure what all this stuff is that I carry. But it’s never… it’s always worked out in the end and I think as time goes on, there is much more understanding about people carrying certain medical devices as they travel.

Bree: In order for the insulin pump to administer insulin and regulate her body’s blood sugar levels, Cilla needs to have the device attached to her stomach all day and night. If you can imagine, it’s like constantly wearing a small mobile phone on your belt. 

Cilla: I can take it off for up to 2 hours if I am like swimming or at the beach but I need it most of the time. So there was this one time I lost it and it was terrible. So I was at the gym there was these little kind of square open lockers that you just put me back in at the front of the gym and I went to that and put my bag in it and then I unclipped my pump so it’s clipped into the little site that sits on my stomach I unclipped and then I put it in my bag. So now I was probably already listening to music or just not concentrating but I put it in my bag and then did my workout. I probably worked out for like 45 minutes to an hour so went back to my bag at the end, picked it up then I walked out of the gym and I got in my car, drove back home, got in the shower, had my shower, got out of the shower, got dressed and then went to put my insulin pump back on. And I looked in my bag and searched my bag and realized it wasn’t in there. And when I first realized I think I felt quite like… I started to feel quite stressed and anxious and I was like oh my goodness where is it and I just searched and searched and what comes into my mind as well is that… this pump is worth about five thousand euros. I started to think, oh my goodness that’s a very expensive machine. Has someone stolen it out of my bag and known that it was an insulin pump or has it just dropped out of somewhere so I searched and searched. I was probably getting more and more stressed and then I thought ok I have to backtrack, I need to retrace my steps and then I thought ok well I was at the gym maybe somehow dropped out of my bag at the gym. So I went back. I think I must have had a little look and couldn’t find it and then I went back to the desk and it turns out that someone handed it in and I felt so relieved and what I think happened is that… when I took my pump off and put it in my bag it dropped into someone else’s bag. It had actually dropped out of my back and into someone else’s cos there was no crashing noise so it’s not like it crashed onto the ground but it probably hit like someone’s soft bag and they took it home with them and fortunately they obviously open their bag and saw this isn’t mine. Good, it’s still work hours for the gym so they took it back to the gym.  

I was so happy, so happy. A massive grin. I was just was like oh my goodness. 

Bree: After experiencing the stress of losing her pump, Cilla was clearly so relieved and pleased to find it back at the gym where she last saw it. Living with diabetes is something that Cilla is well-accustomed to by now but certain days can be more of a struggle than others.

Cilla: I can probably be a bit more critical and hard on myself than what  I should be. The doctors say that you are doing a really good job but I think what can happen is that sometimes you just have days where you’ve got a really high blood sugar and it makes you feel awful but you just kind of get on with it and live your normal life and I try my best and I still feel that now that like even though I’ve had this illness now for 28 years, it’s never stop me doing anything like I’ve been able to travel the world, I’m planning to go skydiving next month and I have also got to do different sports. I got to run a half marathon. It has never stopped me doing things I want. Sometimes I have to delay slightly but it has never stopped me. So I think we have a pretty good relationship now.

Bree: As she mentioned in the podcast, Cilla did in fact go skydiving with her pump and she continues to do a lot of sport. Everything from pilates to running! 

And since recording the podcast, Cilla and her insulin pump have made it home to Australia where she plans to stay for the next little while. Cilla, we wish her all the best on the next chapter of life with diabetes. 

Para escuchar los más de 30 episodios de Into the Story y no perderte los siguientes, suscríbete ahora en Spotify, Apple Podcasts, o en tu reproductor de podcasts favorito. Ok everyone, until next we hope you have a good time or at least a story to tell.

Complete these sentences with a word that you hear in the podcast.

1. 
When Cilla was 3, she experienced __________ like feeling thirsty and feeling tired that led doctors to diagnose her with Type 1 diabetes.

2. 
Type 1 diabetes means that your _________ stops producing insulin, a hormone that your body needs to maintain regular blood sugar levels.

3. 
Both Cilla and her parents needed to adapt to life with diabetes. Cilla’s mum in particular needed to learn how to do ________ counts and give insulin injections to her daughter.

4. 
As a child, Cilla was sometimes not able to go to _________ at her friends’ houses because of her injection schedule.

5. 
Cilla’s insulin pump is a small _________ that she wears on her belt that helps to regulate her insulin levels.

6. 
Wearing an insulin pump all day can sometimes be a __________ when she is travelling through international airports.

7. 
Cilla can remove her insulin pump when she goes ___________ or to the beach but needs it most of the time.

8. 
When Cilla realised that her pump was not in her bag, she felt quite __________ and anxious.

9. 
Cilla decided to __________ and go back to the places that she had been earlier in the day to try and find her insulin pump.

10. 
Cilla lives a pretty normal life with diabetes. She is even planning on __________ next month.

Work out” es un phrasal verb muy útil para añadir a tu vocabulario en inglés ya que es una expresión que muchos angloparlantes utilizan a menudo en su vida cotidiana. Repasemos algunos de sus usos principales! 

En primer lugar, “work out” se utiliza como sinónimo de las palabras “plan” o “elaborate” en inglés. Es posible que escuches a la gente utilizar “to work out” en una frase tal como “we need to work out what we will do with the children during the summer holidays” (“tenemos que planificar lo que haremos con los niños durante las vacaciones de verano”).

“To work out” también puede significar “resolver” en inglés, y se podría utilizar en muchos contextos diferentes, como por ejemplo, “in maths class, you need to work out the solution to the equations” (“en la clase de mates, hay que calcular la solución de las ecuaciones”) o en el trabajo “I need to work out how to solve the client’s problems” (“tengo que averiguar cómo resolver los problemas del cliente”). Un poco como con ‘resolver’ en castellano, ‘work out’ también se utiliza para indicar que algo ha salido bien. “Moving in with my girlfriend was complicated at first, but it worked out in the end. We are very happy now” (“Mudarme con mi novia fué difícil al principio, pero salió bien, ahora estamos muy contentos”).

En el podcast de hoy, escucharemos a Cilla usando la expresión “to work out” en dos contextos distintos. Debido a su diabetes, Cilla necesita llevar muchos medicamentos y utensilios médicos en el avión, lo que puede causarle algunos problemas al pasar por la seguridad del aeropuerto. Primero, veamos cómo Cilla usa el phrasal verb “to work out” para decir que a pesar de los malentendidos, todo suele acabar bien:

‘So there are a lot of myths and misunderstandings and people are just not sure what all this stuff is that I carry. But… it’s always worked out in the end and I think as time goes on, there is much more understanding about people carrying certain medical devices as they travel.

Finalmente, “work out” se usa para hablar de hacer ejercicio o entrenar de forma regular. Puede que oigas a alguien decir en inglés “I love to work out at the gym after work to release stress” (“Me encanta entrenar en el gimnasio después del trabajo para reducir el estrés”). En ocasiones este phrasal verb también se utiliza como nombre, en el cual caso se convierte en una sola palabra. “I worked out for two hours this morning” (“Entrené durante 2 horas esta mañana”)/”I didn’t do my workout this morning” (“No hice mi entrenamiento esta mañana”). Cilla también usa “to work out” para referirse a su entrenamiento, como vemos en esta frase:  

‘I probably worked out for like 45 minutes to an hour so then I went back to my bag at the end, picked it up and then I walked out of the gym’

We hope you enjoyed today’s episode of Into The Story. Si has disfrutado con la historia de Cilla, nos ayudaría muchísimo si nos dejaras un comentario o una buena puntuación en tu plataforma de podcasts favorita. 

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31. A Story About Birthday Parties

Episode 31 - Hannah's Story acingles

Into the Story

EL PODCAST PARA APRENDER INGLÉS CON HISTORIAS REALES

Episode 31 - Hannah's Story acingles

Episodio 31. Birthday Parties

Nivel de inglés:  Intermedio Alto
Acento: Inglés de Liverpool (UK)
Con actividades de comprensión

Hoy vas a mejorar tu inglés escuchando la historia de Hannah. Nuestra protagonista va a cumplir pronto los 30 años, y en lugar de hacer la típica fiesta de cumpleaños, decide aventurarse en un largo viaje en solitario por la India. Will she find herself, or will she find something new? ¿Se encontrará a sí misma, o encontrará algo nuevo? 

Today’s story is about birthday parties. Mientras escuchas a Hannah hablar de lo que vivió en la India, aprenderás vocabulario súper útil, como ‘to end up’, ‘to go south’ and ‘to feed off’. ¡Escuchemos la historia de Hannah para descubrir qué cosas inesperadas le ocurren durante su viaje!

Si te gusta Into the Story, nos ayudarás un montón a producir más y mejores episodios contándoselo a un amigo o familiar que tambien necesite mejorar su inglés.  Y si usas Apple Podcasts, dejándonos una evaluación de 5 estrellas. Thank you so much!

Transcripción del Podcast

Bree: Today’s story is about birthday parties. Nuestra protagonista, Hannah, va a cumplir pronto los 30 años, y en vez de hacer una super fiesta de cumpleaños, decide irse sola a la India…

Hannah: I love  going to other peoples’ birthday parties but the idea of hosting my own birthday party makes me feel sick. So that’s why I decided to do the typical thing and take myself off to India for one month.

Bree: In today’s story you’ll hear Hannah talk about sightseeing in India and discovering the local culture. Along the way, she makes friends with other backpackers staying in hostels all over the country. Her plan is still to spend her birthday alone, but something unexpected is about to happen. Keep listening to find out what that is…

Hey there listeners! We are so excited to bring you this first episode of Season 3 of Into the Story! Si quieres apoyarnos para seguir produciendo nuevos y mejores episodios, comparte este podcast con un amigo o amiga que necesite (un empujoncito) con su inglés. Y si utilizas apple podcasts, déjanos una valoración de 5 estrellas. Thank you so much!

Ok antes de escuchar la historia de hoy, veamos 5 palabras y expresiones interesantes que utiliza HANNAH en este episodio: 

Firstly, the expression ‘to go south’ or ‘to head south’. You might hear English speakers use both these expressions to mean ‘deteriorate’, ‘fall’ or ‘go down’. For example if someone says ‘business is going south’, they mean that business is not doing well or perhaps activity levels are falling. In today’s podcast, Hannah describes her experience in Barcelona as ‘going south’ after she separates from her boyfriend and a few of her friends leave town. ‘To go south’.

Next, ‘to end up’. This phrasal verb, ‘to end up’ means to unexpectedly arrive at a place or to find yourself in an unexpected situation. For example, you could say, ‘I ended up going to the party even though I was feeling sick’ or ‘After wanting sushi for dinner, I ended up ordering pizza.’ ‘To end up’.

A bunch of. The expression ‘a bunch of’ is used to mean a collection of things. Most commonly in English, we talk about ‘a bunch of flowers’ or ‘a bunch of grapes’. But in more informal conversations, you might hear people using ‘a bunch of’ to mean ‘a lot of something’. For instance ‘a bunch of people’ ‘a lot of work’ or ‘a bunch of work’ ‘a lot of work’. 

Next up is the expression ‘to feed off’. ‘To feed off’ can have a few different meanings in English. If someone says ‘the animals feed off the plants’ it means that the animals eat the plants. But if ‘ football players feed off the crowd’s excitement’ this means that they get support or energy from the audience. Hannah, our storyteller, uses ‘feed off’ to mean ‘get inspiration’. You’ll hear her talk about planning her trip around India and ‘feeding off the ideas’ of other travellers. ‘To feed off’. 

And finally, to pull up. This last phrasal verb in this story is used to talk about vehicles coming to a stop.  Instead of simply saying ‘the car stopped in front of the house’ you could say ‘the car pulled up in front of the house’. ‘To pull up’.

And just one thing. Os avisamos que la baja calidad del audio en esta historia hace que sea un poquito más difícil de entender. Pero es una buena práctica para cuando tienes que hablar o escuchar inglés por videollamada y la calidad no es óptima!

¿Quieres la transcripción, la ficha de vocabulario, y un test de comprensión de este episodio? Sigue el enlace en las notas del programa en tu mismo reproductor de podcasts. Ok let’s get into the story…

Hannah: I’m Hannah. I’m here in Barcelona. I’ve been living here now for almost 5 years. But originally I am from Liverpool which is in the north of England. 

In the year before my 30th birthday I had been here in Barcelona for about 2 years. I made some really good friends. I had been dating one of my colleagues at work. Everything was going really well, I was happy with my job. 

And then as people do in this city, a lot of my friends decided to leave which I was obviously really sad about. Things went south a little bit with the boyfriend and we decided to break up. And yeh I just felt a little bit lost… a little bit of who am I? What am I doing? Where am I going? So that’s why I decided to do the typical thing and take myself off to India for 1 month on a little voyage of discovery.

Bree: So it was decided! Hannah’s plan was to spend her 30th birthday travelling on her own around India. She had never really enjoyed organising birthday parties anyway…

Hannah: I love going to other peoples’ birthday parties but the idea of me hosting my own birthday party makes me feel sick like the… the pressure and the stress. Are people going to come? Are they going to have a nice time? Am I going to have to be the center of attention? No, not for me. Not for me.

So, by the time my birthday came around, I would have been there already for 3 weeks. And in my final week, the plan was to fly down to Goa, have some time at the beach, chill out, maybe do some hiking, get a massage, all the typical stuff. Just thinking, doing my own thing. Totally on my own. 

As soon as I landed, I met a girl, Helen, who was from a town actually not far from me in the UK. We decided to take a taxi together from the airport to the hostel and that was sort of our first taste of what it would be like being in India where it was just doors open and people just come towards you, like a wall of people. You want a taxi? Get in mine. No, get in mine! Get in mine. Get in mine. Let me carry your bag. No, I’ll carry your bag. And it’s like woah, incredibly overwhelming. But it’s all new, it’s exciting. We actually ended up in this little tuk tuk going along the highway and holding on to our bags in this tiny little thing as cars are racing past. The tuk tuks are winding past. Even that was an adventure. 

Delhi is insane. People and cars and tuk tuks and stuff everywhere! There is not a moment of silence! It’s huge, absolutely huge! Everywhere you go there’s the beep beep of the horns. There are cows in the middle of the highway. There are cows just walking along. I mean it’s a beautiful city but it’s just chaos. But chaos in the best possible way. 

Bree: Hannah spent her first days in India exploring the city of Delhi, and in the evenings, she often came back to the hostel, where she met other fellow travellers, and shared her experiences with them. 

Hannah: In the hostel I met a whole bunch of other people. And in the day we would tend to do our own things but at night we would sit in the hostel. We would eat, we would drink and talk about our plans. Oh you are going there? I’m going there. I’ll see you there. Or you are getting on that train? I’m getting on that train. I’ll see you there. So it was nice to be in the hostel and sort of feed off other people’s ideas and get some ideas of what to do and where to go because I had planned basically nothing apart from going to Goa at the end. Everything else was totally unplanned.

So after Delhi I went to Agra to see the Taj Mahal.  I arrived really early in the morning at like 6am to see the sunrise. There was hardly anyone there. So it was really beautiful. It was really stunning because it’s not just the main building that you see in all the pictures. There are lots of smaller buildings all around it. And there are these beautiful gardens. It was on a river. I was feeling so far away from my everyday life and just excited really for the rest of the trip. 

After Agra, I headed down to Pushkar which is like a very small, very religious town. There is a huge lake in the middle where people go and bathe themselves and they leave offerings to the gods. So I spent a few days there and when I was there I met a guy who is actually now a really good friend, José. He’s from Honduras but he lives in Amsterdam and I also met 2 couples who were travelling from Malta. We would eat out together, we did a hike up the hill to watch the sunrise together. One night in the hostel, everyone was sharing their stories about what they were there for and I told them that oh you know, it was my birthday coming up and my plan was to fly down to Goa in a few weeks’ time. They were all like, oh that’s a really cool plan, what a great way to celebrate your 30th! You know because it’s meant to be a big one, it’s meant to be special. But no one else had any plans to head down south. 

The most surprising thing about India up to this point, would probably be just how incredibly different it is from everything we know here. The lifestyle is totally different. Religion is really important and everywhere you go the streets are decorated with these beautiful murals to the gods and goddesses. There is so much colour. There’s so much… and obviously there is so much poverty but even in the poverty there seems to be happiness.

Bree: Hannah continued travelling alone around India, exploring, learning about the local culture and making friends along the way.

Hannah: So yeah I stayed in a few more hostels after this one in Pushkar and met a lot of different people. One of the nice things about the trip is that everyone tends to do, if not the same route, the same cities. And also there are not a lot of hostels so you are meeting people and maybe you don’t see them for a few days but then you bump into them again. Then you see someone who had met someone that you had met before and there are these very tenuous connections between everyone and so yeah that was very nice. It was never really… even though I was alone, I was never really, I was never really alone. 

Bree: Before Hannah knew it, her birthday was around the corner.  After a camping trip in the desert with some of her new friends, she said her goodbyes and prepared to make her way down to Goa, in the south of India, on her own.

Hannah: In the morning that I was flying down there, I arrived at the airport and this airport is tiny. It’s basically like a shed. One single building with one door at the front and with one door at the back. And if you wanted to, you could walk around the side to the runway. There was nothing. Just me, in the middle of the desert outside this one building, backpack on. 

Bree: Then, as Hannah waited in the middle of nowhere for the airport to open and her plane to arrive, the most unexpected thing happened. 

Hannah: And then yeh as I am waiting, two taxis pull up. And I’m like ok, more people for the flight, cool. Then out of the taxi gets all these people that I had met while travelling. There was about 11 of us. And yes they had decided that they were going to surprise me. And they were all going to fly down to Goa with me. At first I didn’t believe what I was seeing. I thought ok, this is a mirage. This isn’t happening. And yeah as I came to realise wow they are actually here! They are actually coming with me, this is really happening. I was so happy that I cried. So I am standing there crying, tears of happiness and yeh just disbelief that these people her that I hadn’t known 3 weeks ago had decided to make the effort to come with me to celebrate my birthday. It was amazing. 

Bree: It wasn’t quite the 30th birthday Hannah had planned, but it was a pleasant surprise to spend her special day accompanied by a group of friendly faces. 

Hannah: So my birthday was the next day and we arrived in Goa. It was the middle of the monsoon season, which I had known. The plan that we had made the night before which was to go to the beach and hang out and have some sort of barbecue obviously could not happen because it was just monsoon rains. So we did some googling and we found out that there was a waterpark nearby. So we put on our bikinis and we put on our flip flops and we walked like 40 minutes to this waterpark in these insane monsoon rains. We arrived there and there was obviously no one else there. There was just this group of us on this crazy waterpark that obviously had no safety rules or regulations. These slides when you go down and we fly up in the air and you are banging back down again. Yeh it was just a really fun day. And then in the afternoon, we went back to the hostel, and the guys had told the guys at the hostel that it was my birthday so they brought a cake, everyone sang happy birthday and there were drinks, there was food and yeah we spent the night in the hostel with the staff having a little private party there. 

It was nothing like what I had expected but yeah it was amazing. I think it was probably my best birthday to date. Just because it was such a surprise, it was so different and I just  felt surrounded by love by these people who were essentially strangers. And yeah it just showed me that there is a lot of love in the world and a lot of people coming together to make the best of the situation and yeah it was just lovely. 

Bree: These days, Hannah can still be found enjoying life in Barcelona. Her last couple birthdays have been a bit more conventional, but now, she knows that the key to having an excellent day is to be surrounded by nature and good company. Hannah is still in contact with some of the friends who surprised her that day in India, and she hopes to be able to visit them very soon. 

Para escuchar los más de 30 episodios de Into the Story y no perderte los siguientes, suscríbete ahora en Spotify, Apple Podcasts, o en tu reproductor de podcasts favorito. Ok everyone, until next we hope you have a good time or at least a story to tell.

Quote of the episode

‘I love going to other peoples’ birthday parties, but the idea of me hosting my own birthday party makes me feel sick, like, the 'Are they going to have a nice time?' 'Am I going to have to be the center of attention?' No, not for me. Not for me.’

Hannah

Test de comprensión

Complete these sentences with a word that you hear in the podcast.

1. 
After a few of Hannah’s friends left Barcelona and she broke up with her boyfriend, she said she was feeling a little bit ………… .

2. 
Hannah prefers not to host her own birthday parties because she doesn’t like being the centre of …………..

3. 
At the airport, Hannah is met by lots of taxi drivers all trying to get her attention and carry her bags. The experience was incredibly ………… for her in the beginning.

4. 
In the hostel, Hannah enjoyed talking to other travellers and …………….. their ideas to help her plan her own trip.

5. 
When Hannah arrived at the Taj Majal, she felt ………….. from her everyday life back in Barcelona.

6. 
The most surprising thing about India for Hannah was how colourful and different the cities were and how much ……….. people felt despite their poverty.

7. 
The airport where Hannah went to catch her flight to Goa was very small and simple. She describes it as being basically a …………….

8. 
When Hannah realised that the other travellers had decided to join her for her birthday in Goa, she cried …………… of happiness!

9. 
It was the ……………… season in the south of India so the group of travellers decided to go to a waterpark instead of hosting a barbecue.

10. 
It had not been the birthday she had planned but thanks to these strangers, Hannah felt so …………… by love on her 30th birthday.

Significado de 'to end up' en inglés

La expresión “to end up” en inglés es un phrasal verb muy útil que a muchos estudiantes, incluso de nivel B2, les cuesta utilizar correctamente. 

To end up” se traduce a menudo al español con la palabra “terminar” o “acabar“, pero en realidad tiene muchos usos que son más complicados y matizados en inglés. “To end up somewhere” o “to end up doing something” en inglés significa llegar finalmente a un lugar o lograr una situación concreta. 

Veamos algunos ejemplos. Si alguien te dijera en inglés “I ended up staying in Spain for 3 months even though I had only booked a 2 week holiday there“. En esta frase, la expresión “to end up” significa que sus planes originales cambiaron y finalmente decidieron quedarse más tiempo en España. O en esta frase: “He said he didn’t want to end up working in an office“. Aquí, “to end up” significa que la persona no quiere llegar a una situación en la que trabaje en una oficina. 

En el episodio de hoy, escucharemos a Hannah usando la expresión “to end up” para hablar de su experiencia en el aeropuerto tratando de llegar al hostal. Cuando salió del aeropuerto, había taxis y gente por todas partes! Finalmente ella decidió tomar un tuk tuk. Veamos como Hannah usa la expresión “to end up” en este contexto: 

‘We actually ended up in this little tuk tuk going along the highway and holding on to our bags in this tiny little thing as cars are racing past. The tuk tuks are winding past. Even that was an adventure.’

Learning materials

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